All posts by lraymertx@gmail.com

Get informed & inspired at the 3rd Medicinal Cannabis Conference

It’s THIS weekend , but don’t wait until Saturday to begin learning!

There is a free lecture with Dr. Sulak on Friday night.  Dr. Sulak is one of our presenters for the weekend and is offering this wonderful opportunity to learn “Ways That Cannabis May Be Used to Treat Chronic Illness.”

5:00-6:30 pm
Arcata Community Center

 

DON’T MISS THE ENTIRE WEEKEND.  AVOID STANDING IN LINE TO REGISTER, JUST CLICK HERE AND SIGN UP!

BELOW ARE SOME COMMON QUESTIONS THAT ARE OFTEN ASKED ABOUT MEDICINAL CANNABIS:

How do I obtain medical cannabis?

In order for an individual to become a medical cannabis patient they will need a doctor’s recommendation for medical cannabis commonly referred to as a 215 recommendation. Patients should talk to their doctor about using medical cannabis for their specific ailments.  (CA)

Read more details!
How do I use medical cannabis?

Cannabis has been used for centuries as a medicine. Many patients are familiar with seeing cannabis smoked, but that is only one of its applications. At HPRC patients can find cannabis flowers, topicals, tinctures, oils, edibles, raw plant, vapor pens, transdermal patches, teas, bath soaks, and other medical cannabis applications.

Read more details!

JOIN US FOR A WEEKEND OF LEARNING  AT THE 3rd ANNUAL MEDICINAL CANNABIS CONFERENCE.  CLICK HERE TO REGISTER. 

This learning moment was sponsored by:
Humboldt Patient Resource Center
980 6th St. Arcata CA 95521
707-826-7988

The information presented in this article is not to be considered medical advice and is for informational purposes only. Always work with your primary care giver when making decisions about medicine use.

 

What to Look for in Your Cannabis Medicine

leaf-med-2.150pxWhen choosing a cannabis medicine, look for:
  • CBD-Rich Products: For maximum therapeutic impact, choose products that include both CBD, a non-intoxicating compound, and THC, the main psychoactive component of cannabis. CBD and THC work best together, enhancing each other’s therapeutic benefits.
  • Clear Labels: Look for labels showing the quantity and ratio of CBD and THC per dose, a manufacturing date and batch number (for quality control).
  • Lab Testing: Look for products that are tested for consistency, and verified as free of mold, bacteria, pesticides, solvent residues, and other contaminants.
  • Quality Ingredients: Select products with quality ingredients. No corn syrup, GMOs, transfats, and artificial additives.
  • Safe Extraction: Avoid products extracted with toxic solvents like BHO, propane, hexane or other hydrocarbons. Solvent residues are especially dangerous for immune-compromised patients. Look for products that entail a safer method of extraction like supercritical CO2.
  • Cannabis Not Industrial Hemp: Compared to whole plant cannabis, hemp is typically low in cannabinoid content. A huge amount of hemp is required to extract a small amount of CBD, raising the risk of contaminants because hemp, a bioaccumulator, draws toxins from the soil. The robust terpene profile of whole plant cannabis enhances the therapeutic benefits of CBD and THC.
This learning moment was provided by:
Project CBD Director, Martin A Lee
https://www.projectcbd.org

 

Relief from Cancer Symptoms and Treatment Side Effects

Relief From Cancer Symptoms and Treatment Side Effects
By Dustin Sulak DO
www.healer.com

When used properly, cannabis can be a safe and effective treatment for nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy, chronic pain, and insomnia. Animal studies have c cancer cannabisshown that cannabinoids can prevent the development of neuropathic pain, a common side effect of chemotherapy.

The use of cannabis in the treatment of cancer is an emerging field in medicine, and your
cannabinoid medicine specialist should admit to knowing very little about the optimal dosage of the various cannabinoids. By staying up to date on the research and collaborating with other leaders in the field, providers like my colleagues and myself can continue to meet the needs of real patients who choose not to wait for the federal government to stop obstructing human research on cannabis and cancer. Medical cannabis can be a part of an integrative plan that addresses your mind, body, spirit, family, and community.

For a comprehensive review of the anticancer effects of cannabinoids, with numerous
personal success stories, I suggest Justin Kander’s book “Cannabis for the Treatment of
Cancer: The Anticancer Activity of Phytocannabinoids and Endocannabinoids,” available
online.
Read more about The Use of Cannabis to Fight Cancer and Promote Healing
http://healer.com/cannabis-and-cancer/

 

Marijuana and Weight Loss

Marijuana Use Associated with Decreased Chance of Developing Metabolic Syndrome

First the bad news: The United States is facing epidemic levels of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Now the good news if you are a cannabis consumer: According to a recent study published in the American Journal of Medicine, marijuana users are much less likely than non-users to develop metabolic syndrome, which is a significant risk factor for obesity, type II diabetes, and heart disease.   READ MORE!

This learning moment provided by:
Martin A. Lee, The CBD Project

 

 

Synthetic vs. Whole Plant CBD

cbd-versus-synthetic-marijuanaCannabis versus synthetic cannabinoids
By Martin A. Lee on February 22, 2015

A groundbreaking study from Israel has documented the superior therapeutic properties of whole plant CBD-rich cannabis extract as compared to synthetic, single-molecule cannabidiol (CBD).
Published in the journal Pharmacology & Pharmacy (Feb. 2015), the article directly challenges one of the sacred cows of Big Pharma and the medical-industrial complex — the notion that “crude” botanical preparations are inherently low grade and less effective than pure, single-molecule compounds.

Entitled “Overcoming the Bell-Shaped Dose-Response of Cannabidiol by Using Cannabis Extract Enriched in Cannabidiol,” the article is all the more noteworthy given the contribution of co-author Lumir Hanus, who was instrumental in the discovery of anandamide, the endogenous cannabinoid compound first identified in the mammalian brain in 1992.
READ MORE ABOUT THIS!

This learning moment provided by:
Martin A. Lee, The CBD Project

 

Cannabis: Myths & Facts

Over all, marijuana has gotten a bad name due to decades of prohibition and reefer madness-like thinking – in fact, the word “marijuana” was first used in U.S. policy during an effort to marginalize Mexican immigrants in the early 1900s. As our society works to help this misunderstood plant find its appropriate place in our laws , I recommend using its real name that dispels the myths about this incredible plant and invokes the truth made available by thousands of scientists and researchers: cannabis. Cannabis has a lot to offer humanity, and you deserve to know the truth.

By Dustin Sulak, DO

http://www.healer.com

Here are some of the common myths about marijuana, many of which have been sponsored by industries that benefit from the prohibition of marijuana, along with the facts:

http://healer.com/marijuana-myths-cannabis-facts/ 

By Dustin Sulak, DO
www.healer.com

JOIN US FOR A WEEKEND OF LEARNING  AT THE 3rd ANNUAL MEDICINAL CANNABIS CONFERENCE.  CLICK HERE TO REGISTER. 

STATE MEDICAL MARIJUANA LAWS

STATE MEDICAL MARIJUANA LAWS

In 1996, California voters passed Proposition 215, making the Golden State the first in the union to allow for the medical use of marijuana. Since then, 27 more states, the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico have enacted similar laws.

A total of 28 states, the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico now allow for comprehensive public medical marijuana and cannabis programs.  Recently approved efforts in 17 states allow use of “low THC, high cannabidiol (CBD)” products for medical reasons in limited situations or as a legal defense. Those programs are not counted as comprehensive medical marijuana programs but are listed in Table 2. NCSL uses criteria similar to other organizations to determine if a program is “comprehensive”:

Read more and  Get the details by state.
This learning moment is brought to by The National Conference of State Legislatures.

JOIN US FOR A WEEKEND OF LEARNING  AT THE 3rd ANNUAL MEDICINAL CANNABIS CONFERENCE.  CLICK HERE TO REGISTER. 

What are the differences in state laws regarding medical marijuana?

STATE MEDICAL MARIJUANA LAWS

In 1996, California voters passed Proposition 215, making the Golden State the first in the union to allow for the medical use of marijuana. Since then, 27 more states, the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico have enacted similar laws.

A total of 28 states, the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico now allow for comprehensive public medical marijuana and cannabis programs.  Recently approved efforts in 17 states allow use of “low THC, high cannabidiol (CBD)” products for medical reasons in limited situations or as a legal defense. Those programs are not counted as comprehensive medical marijuana programs but are listed in Table 2. NCSL uses criteria similar to other organizations to determine if a program is “comprehensive”:

Read more and  Get the details by state.
This learning moment is brought to by The National Conference of State Legislatures.

JOIN US FOR A WEEKEND OF LEARNING  AT THE 3rd ANNUAL MEDICINAL CANNABIS CONFERENCE.  CLICK HERE TO REGISTER. 

PTSD and Medicinal Cannabis

PTSD and Medicinal Cannabis
Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition triggered by experiencing or seeing a terrifying event.
Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition triggered by experiencing or seeing a terrifying event.

Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition triggered by experiencing or seeing a terrifying event. Common symptoms of PTSD include anger, nervousness, anxiety, guilt, issues with sleep, depression, and headaches. Patients as well as family members who are suffering from PTSD can have their lives dramatically impacted by this ailment. Any individual can suffer from PTSD, but the men and women of our military forces are returning home suffering from PTSD at an alarming rate.
Treatment for PTSD includes psychotherapy and medications. There are many types of promising therapies including counseling, cognitive behavioral therapy, anger management, and group therapies. The most commonly prescribed medications are Zoloft, Xanax, Prozac, and Paxil. While these drugs may be helpful in treatment for some, many patients experience adverse side effects from these drugs. Some side effects include nausea, insomnia, decreased libido, anxiety, and issues with appetite.  These side effects may outweigh the benefits for  certain patients, driving them to find medicinal alternatives.

Cannabis may be effective for patients suffering from PTSD for a variety of reasons.  Thankfully there are now significant changes taking place for our soldiers returning home.

READ MORE ABOUT THIS! (the Senate Appropriations Committee approved the Veteran’s Medical Marijuana Amendment AND recent research.)

JOIN US FOR A WEEKEND OF LEARNING  AT THE 3rd ANNUAL MEDICINAL CANNABIS CONFERENCE.  CLICK HERE TO REGISTER. 

This learning moment was sponsored by:

Humboldt Patient Resource Center
980 6th St. Arcata CA 95521
707-826-7988

The information presented in this article is not to be considered medical advice and is for informational purposes only. Always work with
your primary care giver when making decisions about medicine use.